Tag Archives: macos

zsh PS1 setup

macOS Catalina uses zsh as the new default shell (instead of bash) in Terminal. This means that many people will be looking to re-setup their CLI with ~/.zshrc instead of ~/.bash_profile.

While customizing my .zshrc was a hassle, it was also an opportunity to clean up my profile and remove legacy settings.

Zsh offers an optional right side prompt, but I only used the left side prompt for now.

Here are some misc tips that I’ve found helpful:

  • For basic PS1 exports (time/date, current dir, user, etc), you can find examples here. Things like %D for the current date, %~ for the current directoy, and more.
  • In your PS1 export, you can start color formatting with %F{117} and end color formatting with %f. Replace 117 with whatever color your desire. You can find color codes here.
  • You can make your tab auto completion case insensitive (ignore case) by adding:
    zstyle ':completion:*' matcher-list 'm:{[:lower:]}={[:upper:]}'
    autoload -Uz compinit && compinit -i
  • You can show your current git branch with:
    autoload -Uz vcs_info
    precmd() { vcs_info }
    zstyle ':vcs_info:git:*' formats '(%b)'
    setopt prompt_subst

    Note: you also need to add $vcs_info_msg_0_ in your PS1 export line.

I’ve thought about creating a zshrc WYSIWYG tool, ala Halloween Bash, but I’ve shelved those plans since there’s only so much time in a day. With macOS Catalina inevitable for macOS users, more and more people are going to be looking for easy ~/.zshrc customization.

Using SVG / PDF assets in your iOS app

This guide covers a simple way to use SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) assets in your iOS app. This was tested on macOS High Sierra 10.13 with Xcode 9.4 and Swift 4.

There are many websites where you can find SVG icons. Check out Material or ionicons

  1. Install homebrew & python3 for macOS (if you don’t have it)
  2. Install cairosvg. The code below installs various dependencies
    brew install python3 cairo pango gdk-pixbuf libffi
    
    pip3 install cairosvg
  3. Convert your SVG icons to PDF files. Make sure to navigate to the location of your SVG icon files. Run this command for each icon file (with the relevant *.svg & *.pdf input / output file name):
    cairosvg icon.svg -o icon.pdf
  4. Drag your PDF files into your Xcode Assets.xcassets folder
  5. Adjust the settings for each icon in your xcassets. You may want to adjust:
    1. Name – this is important as you will refer to this in your Swift code to use the icon
    2. Set ‘Render As’ to ‘Template Image’
    3. Check the box for ‘Resizing – Preserve Vector Data’
    4. Set ‘Scales’ to ‘Single Scale’
  6. Use your icon in your app. I did this programmatically in Swift, and this works in your ViewController. Make sure to update the ‘iconName’ to match what is in your xcassets for your icon file.
    if let icon = UIImage(named: "iconName") {
        let image = UIImageView(image: icon)
        image.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
        image.tintColor = UIColor.blue
        view.addSubview(image)
    
        NSLayoutConstraint.activate([
            image.leadingAnchor.constraint(equalTo: view.leadingAnchor),
            image.centerYAnchor.constraint(equalTo: view.centerYAnchor),
            image.widthAnchor.constraint(equalToConstant: 24),
            image.heightAnchor.constraint(equalToConstant: 24),
            ])
    }
  7.  That’s it. Your SVG file was converted to a PDF file, added into your Xcode assets, and called from your ViewController!