Tag Archives: xcode

Using CoreMotion deviceMotion to keep image level example (Xcode 8.3, Swift 3.1)

I’ve been playing around with CoreMotion since it is frankly so cool. I’ve followed NSHipster’s CMDevice​Motion post, but I made some changes to use the latest Swift v3.1. Below is sample code for using both the gyroscope and accelerometer to keep an image level when you rotate your phone.

//
//  ViewController.swift
//
//  Created by Rex on 4/22/17.
//

import UIKit
import CoreMotion

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    let interval = 0.01
    let imageFilename = "bg.jpg"
    let imageWidth = CGFloat(800)
    let imageHeight = CGFloat(1200)
    
    let manager = CMMotionManager()
    var imageView: UIImageView?

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        guard manager.isDeviceMotionAvailable else { return }
        
        setImageView()
        
        manager.deviceMotionUpdateInterval = interval
        let queue = OperationQueue()
        
        manager.startDeviceMotionUpdates(to: queue, withHandler: {(data, error) in
            guard let data = data else { return }
            let gravity = data.gravity
            let rotation = atan2(gravity.x, gravity.y) - .pi

            OperationQueue.main.addOperation {
                self.imageView?.transform = CGAffineTransform(rotationAngle: CGFloat(rotation))
            }
        })
    }
    
    func setImageView() {
        if let img = UIImage(named: imageFilename) {
            let iv = UIImageView(image: img)

            // center the image
            let x = (self.view.frame.width/2)-(imageWidth/2)
            let y = (self.view.frame.height/2)-(imageHeight/2)
            iv.frame = CGRect(x: x, y: y, width: imageWidth, height: imageHeight)
            
            self.view.addSubview(iv)
            self.imageView = iv
        }
    }
    
}

The setup is simple. Create a new Single View Application project in Xcode. You’ll need to add a JPG to the Assets.xcassets folder in the project. Replace the Viewcontroller with the code below and make sure to update the image filename, width, and height constants.

The code hopefully is straightforward. We make sure the CMMotionManager’s device motion is available. Then, we add the imageview (as the only UIView element we’re adding to the screen). We use an OperationQueue to process the rotation calculation off the main queue. Then we update the imageview with a transform on the main queue.

iOS 10 Locales and Currency Symbols – Sample App

While working on adding localization to my tip calculator, one thing that seems obvious in retrospect is the difference between a device’s language & region. iOS lets you set the language & region separately. For example, you might want to read text in English, but you could be in Asia. This is relevant to tipping since you could travel to a country where tipping is expected, but the country your phone’s language is associated with doesn’t traditionally tip.

While exploring locales and currency symbols, I whipped together a basic demo app that lets you scroll between all the known locales and their currency symbol in iOS 10. This is pretty useful since you can quickly see what the currencySymbol is for each known iOS locale.

Below is the full implementation of very hacked together (quick and dirty) code. All you need to do:

  • Create new Single View Application project in Xcode
  • Replace the ViewController.swift with below (written for Swift 3)
  • Run the app in Xcode
import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController, UITableViewDelegate {
    
    let cellIdentifier = "Cell"
    let currentLocaleHeight = CGFloat(80)
    
    let locales = Locale.availableIdentifiers.sorted { $0.localizedCaseInsensitiveCompare($1) == ComparisonResult.orderedAscending }
    
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        
        let tableView: UITableView = UITableView()
        tableView.frame = CGRect(x: 0, y: currentLocaleHeight, width: view.frame.width, height: view.frame.height)
        tableView.dataSource = self
        tableView.delegate = self
        
        self.view.addSubview(tableView)
        
        addCurrentLocaleLabel()
    }
    
    func addCurrentLocaleLabel() {
        let local = Locale.current.identifier
        
        let width = view.frame.width
        let label = UILabel(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: width, height: currentLocaleHeight))
        label.text = "Current locale: " + local
        label.textAlignment = .center
        view.addSubview(label)
    }
    
}

extension ViewController: UITableViewDataSource {
    
    func numberOfSections(in tableView: UITableView) -> Int {
        return 1
    }
    
    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
        return locales.count
    }
    
    func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
        let cell = UITableViewCell(style: .value1, reuseIdentifier: cellIdentifier)
        
        let localeString = locales[indexPath.row]
        
        let numberFormatter = NumberFormatter()
        numberFormatter.locale = Locale(identifier: localeString)
        
        cell.textLabel?.text = localeString
        cell.detailTextLabel?.text = numberFormatter.currencySymbol
        
        return cell
    }

}

Note that the “¤” symbol means the currency is unspecified.

Using Fastlane Snapshot to generate screenshots with UIPickerViews

This week, I released an update for my Tip Solver calculator to add Chinese localization. I had to generate 5 screenshots for 5 devices (iPhone and iPad) across 3 languages. In the time that I spent automating the process with Fastlane Snapshot, I could have easily done it manually in way less time. But the good news is that I’ve set myself up to painlessly generate screenshots for new languages. Snapshot takes some time to run, but it’s still a huge improvement over generating screenshots manually.

It took me a lot longer than I would have liked to setup my Snapshot process due to my usage of UIPickerViews. Tip Solver makes heavy usage of UIPickerView and I ran into many issues with UITest.

Your mileage may vary, but I found I had to do the following to be able to use UITest and UIPickerViews:

  • disable Ads (which run over the network)
  • drastically reduce the number of UIPickerView rows (in numberOfRowsInComponent)
  • use titleForRow instead of viewForRow for UITest running

The last one (using titleForRow) was a complete non starter since I rely on heavy UIPickerView visual customization. Generating screenshots with incorrect picker views defeats the whole point of the exercise.

I tried using the Xcode’s UITest recorder, but I ran into many issues. One glaring issue is that while recording, I was able to swipe the UIPicker up, but when I played it back, it ended up swiping up the Control Center (instead of adjusting the UIPicker). There is a method (adjustToPickerWheelValue), but I found that it only works with titleForRow (which I don’t use). What I would like is an expansion of the XCUIElement API to add a simple increment/move up or down once.

My final solution (aka work around) was to use a combination of Fastlane launch arguments & brute forcing the UIView (via UIViewController viewDidAppear) to generate my screenshots. My work around isn’t ideal, but it gets the job done.

In my Fastlane Snapfile, I was able to define arguments:

launch_arguments([
 "-screenshot 1",
 "-screenshot 2",
 "-screenshot 3",
 "-screenshot 4",
 "-screenshot 5"
])

In my ViewController (running Swift 3), I was able to handle them accordingly:

let screenshot = UserDefaults.standard.string(forKey: "screenshot")
if screenshot == "1" {
    // do something
} else if screenshot == "2" {
    // do something
} else if screenshot == "3" {
    // do something
} else if screenshot == "4" {
    // do something
} else if screenshot == "5" {
    // do something
}

Once everything is setup, generating screenshots was simply running snapshot on the command line.

I’m sure there’s room for improvement in the code (using an enum, etc.), but I left it at that since it’s only for screenshot generation.

If you’ve made it all the way down here, thanks for reading. I just wanted to share my experience with UITest and UIPickers. UITest probably needs more love from Apple as it was not pleasant to work with.

 

How to open phone app from iMessage extension and pass data

This weekend, I spent some time digging into iOS 10 iMessage app extensions.

Creating an iMessage app or sticker pack is relatively easy. Here are a couple of resources for getting started: tutsplus and medium. Apple also has their own example iMessage app.

For a new iMessage only app, you can choose File > New > Project and either ‘Sticker Pack Application’ or ‘iMessage Application’ in Xcode. To add an iMessage extension to your existing containing phone app, you can use File > New > Target and either ‘Sticker Pack Extension’ or ‘iMessage Extension’.

I wanted to understand the current state of user workflow between the iOS (main/phone) app and the iMessage extension app. Apple has it’s work cut out for them. The iMessage App store is an awkward modal triggered from an individual iMessage conversation. Users seem to have trouble locating the store and managing iMessage apps, so apps are getting bad reviews.

The good news is that you can launch your phone app from the iMessage app.

From the iMessage extension app, you can use this (with your own AppName):

guard let url: URL = URL(string: "AppName://?myParam=myValue") else { return }

self.extensionContext?.open(url, completionHandler: { (success: Bool) in
 
 })

Calling the above code will open the phone app. One issue I ran into (under the extension scheme) is that the phone app will crash in the simulator when opened this way. Xcode shows a SIGKILL since the iMessage app connected to Xcode is quit while the phone app is being opened. This appears to only be a simulator issue.

You can access the URL params in your phone app’s App Delegate:

    func application(_ app: UIApplication, open url: URL, options: [UIApplicationOpenURLOptionsKey : Any] = [:]) -> Bool {

        return true

    }

The bad news is that you cannot launch your iMessage app from your phone app. Apple must have been short on time, as their usual modus operandi is to launch headline features that are incomplete and hopefully iterate later if their business still cares. Radar(s) have been filed.

When asked, “Is it possible for my app to open the Messages app with my iMessage extension activated?” An Apple Staff member says, “There currently isn’t a way to do this.”

I think opening your iMessage app from your phone app would be an excellent, natural use case. User does something in the containing app, then they want to share that app’s state with a friend using iMessage. Why rely on the user going to Messages, finding your iMessage app in the correct convo, and then recreating app state to send it over?

So to recap, iMessage apps have a lot of potential as they are living apps within iMessages. They can communicate with their containing app. But I have reservations about the UX, including discoverability.

iOS Universal iPad Portrait Gotcha

I wanted to share a small tip that reinforces the necessity of on-device (non-simulator) testing.

While finalizing my latest iOS app (universal for both iPhone & iPad), I found an issue through manual QA on an actual iPad. I had only left Portrait checked in the Project > General section of Xcode, but my app was somehow running in landscape mode on the iPad.

general

Confused as to why it was rendering in both landscape & portrait mode on my iPad, I found a handy stack overflow post.

For one reason or another, you have to update your Info.plist to only specify portrait settings for iPads. Below is my Info.plist after I updated it to only target Portrait mode.

info_plist

It’s confusing as to why the Project General section’s Device Orientation is not sufficient to force only Portrait orientations and you have to also update the Info.plist.

Through simulator testing, it’s not likely that I would have caught onto this portrait vs landscape issue. I relied mostly on my primary iPhone and copious amounts of simulator testing for the other iOS universal devices.

For the highest level of quality control, you would need an iPhone 4s, iPhone 5, iPhone 6, iPhone 6+, iPad, and iPad Pro. That’s a lot of devices and I certainly don’t have all of those. Sidenote: if you do have all those devices, you would also be positioned to record App Preview videos for all devices natively (AKA lots of work).

Freeing up disk space as an iOS Developer

As an iOS Developer, I often have trouble updating to the latest version of Xcode since my 128GB MacBook Air keeps filling up.

Common culprits include ~/Library/Developer/Xcode/DerivedData and ~/Library/Developer/Xcode/iOS DeviceSupport.

By clearing out those two folders, I’m able to free up 11GB at this time of writing. For more information on what these folders contain, this was helpful.

Logging during development with Apple Watch hardware

Inserting breakpoints or logging statements (such as NSLog) is relatively straightforward with an iPhone-only iOS app. But how do you log from the WatchKit Extension (aka Watch app)?

The good news is that logging isn’t filled with many complicated steps. The bad news is that the logging works intermittently.

  1. Add your NSLog statements in your WatchKit Extension. This is probably your InterfaceController.m
  2. Run the watch app on iOS Device + watchOS Device (in the WatchKit App scheme)
  3. Select Debug > Attach to Process > (click on your watch app name)
  4. Profit! You should see your NSLogs when they are triggered in the app lifecycle in Xcode

debug

If logging isn’t working, try typical Xcode debug steps such as:

  • deleting the app on your phone & re-running it in Xcode
  • restarting the phone and/or watch devices
  • clean Xcode (cmd + shift + k) and re-run the app
  • quit & restart Xcode

Apple GameCenter Implementation Strategy

Having worked on my first app that implements GameCenter, I had a lot of questions about the process. The main question was how do I implement GameCenter into my app? Do I need to pick the right application template when creating my Xcode project? Do I need to use SpriteKit? Etc

The good news is that GameCenter can be added on after the rest of your application is ready. You should focus on your game mechanics, game engine, user friendliness, etc. After you are satisfied with the core experience, you can add GameCenter (leaderboard, achievements, and other features) afterwards. You can choose any application template and you don’t have to use SpriteKit.

In my app, I had both a phone app & a watch app. You will need to implement GameCenter using Apple’s GameKit Framework. GameKit is currently only for the iPhone, so GameCenter logic needs to be called in the Phone app.

I found great Apple documentation with the same advice:

Here’s a reasonable process to follow when designing a game that supports Game Center:

  1. Decide which Game Center features you plan to support.
  2. Define your game mechanics, keeping in mind the requirements and limitations of Game Center.
  3. Implement your game engine, ignoring Game Center for now. Focus on developing the other aspects of your game, such as your game engine and gameplay. You do this to avoid needing to create an iTunes Connect record earlier than you need to.
  4. [implement Game Center]

As with any app, focus on nailing the key user experience. Then worry about implementing/integrating GameCenter in your app.

Setup Apple Watch for Development Guide

While working in Xcode and running my watch app on my actual hardware watch for the first time, I ran into this error on my watch the first time: “Failed to install [app], error: Application Verification Failed.” This stack overflow answer provides the solution, but I wanted help illustrate the steps I took to fix the error. Disclaimer: this worked for me, but there are probably more optimal ways of fixing the error.

  1. In Xcode, get the UDID of your Apple Watch (WIndow > Devices). The UDID is labeled “Identifier” and you can double click on the Identifier device hash to select & copy it.
    1
  2. Visit the Apple Developer Portal at https://developer.apple.com/devcenter/ios/index.action and click on “Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles” in the right sidebar.
    2
  3. Click on Devices > All in the left sidebar.
    3
  4. Click on the Plus Sign (+) in the top right.
    4
  5. In Register Device, provide a Name (whatever you want) and your watch UDID (from step 1 above).
    5
  6. Submit the form to register your watch device.
  7. In “Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles”, locate your .watchkitextension Provisioning Profile for your app. Select & download this profile.
    7
  8. Locate your downloaded profile file on your computer & double click the Provisioning Profile.
  9. Restart Xcode.
  10. Build your project and you will encounter a iOS Development Certificate alert.
    10
  11. Warning, this step may be dangerous (proceed at your own risk). This worked for me. Click on “Revoke and Request”. This will revoke your current certificate and request a new one. You will probably get an email notifying you that “Your Certificate Has Been Revoked”.
  12. Run your Xcode project. Your watch app should now load the development build on your actual watch hardware.

About the author: Rex Feng enjoys iOS development and has released Pomodoro Pro for the iPhone & Apple Watch. You can follow him @rexfeng.

Fix no matching provisioning profiles validation issue

Here’s a quick problem & solution that worked for me. Hopefully this helps others out there.

Situation:

Validating an archive prior to submitting the build to the App Store, but it fails validation. I am using App Groups (for the phone app & watch app).

Problem:

Validating my archive created two “no matching provisioning profiles found” errors. The error was specifically related to “none of the valid provisioning profiles allowed the specified entitlements betareports-active com.apple.security.application-groups”.

Solution:

In my case, my development was able to use App Groups, but the production/distribution environment was not setup yet.

Under Provisioning Profiles > Distribution (https://developer.apple.com/account/ios/profile/), create an Distribution / App Store for each App ID that you need. In my case, I had to create one for the phone app & one for the watchkit extension. Make sure to download each after generating them. Double click on your downloaded files to automatically load them into Xcode.

When I tried to validate my archive again, I was able to successfully validate (after generating & loading my new Provisioning Profiles).