Tag Archives: phone

Rob Pike’s dream setup

I recently came across a short article on Uses This.

Rob Pike talks about his setup. His response for his dream setup & having stateless devices really intrigued me.

Twenty years ago, you expected a phone to be provided everywhere you went, and that phone worked the same everywhere. At a friend’s house, or a restaurant, or a hotel, or a pay phone, you could pick up the receiver and make a call. You didn’t carry a phone around with you; phones were part of the infrastructure.

– Rob Pike
https://usesthis.com/interviews/rob.pike/

This is hard to imagine today or in the future for computers. A world where you didn’t have to carry around a mobile phone. You simply used the mobile phone wherever you went. For many reasons, what Rob talks about for phones (applied to computers) doesn’t seem likely.

But it’s nice to imagine a world where you didn’t have to update your phone every couple of years. You could rely on a device at home or at work to pick up where you left off, without having to lug something expensive around and keep it charged.

Real Life Facebook Button

A dedicated button for Facebook on your phone? With super awkward placement?

While this Fb x Real Life mashup is unnecessary, I wanted to look at other examples of company logos on real life buttons. Most companies that produce hardware are content with having their logo printed onto a surface instead of a pushable button.

Note: images are used only to illustrate hardware buttons. Each logo is property of their respective owner.

Blackberry has been doing this for some time. Note the natural location among the keys.

A natural category for buttons is remotes. Specifically TV remote controls.

TiVo has been doing this for a while with their quirky logo.

Netflix is rolling out their logo as more and more devices ship with an embedded Netflix app. Apparently, Yahoo got onto this remote as a bonus.

Another category with branded buttons is video game consoles. Their controllers have gained logo buttons with the current generation of hardware.

The original Xbox had a giant logo, but it wasn’t one you could press. The Xbox 360 has a pushable logo for Xbox’s dashboard.

Playstation 3 getting its logo on.

An easily overlooked category would be the keyboard. Countless keyboards have the Windows logo.

Here is an example of the ubiquitous¬†Windows keyboards that exist. The Windows key is useful for certain shortcuts (Win + D for desktop), but a pain when you’re in the middle of a full screen game.

Some Mac keyboards have an Apple logo.

While the Facebook logo above is placed awkwardly for dramatic effect, most company logos are placed logically in a manner that consumers use every day.