Tag Archives: dev

Setup Apple Watch for Development Guide

While working in Xcode and running my watch app on my actual hardware watch for the first time, I ran into this error on my watch the first time: “Failed to install [app], error: Application Verification Failed.” This stack overflow answer provides the solution, but I wanted help illustrate the steps I took to fix the error. Disclaimer: this worked for me, but there are probably more optimal ways of fixing the error.

  1. In Xcode, get the UDID of your Apple Watch (WIndow > Devices). The UDID is labeled “Identifier” and you can double click on the Identifier device hash to select & copy it.
    1
  2. Visit the Apple Developer Portal at https://developer.apple.com/devcenter/ios/index.action and click on “Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles” in the right sidebar.
    2
  3. Click on Devices > All in the left sidebar.
    3
  4. Click on the Plus Sign (+) in the top right.
    4
  5. In Register Device, provide a Name (whatever you want) and your watch UDID (from step 1 above).
    5
  6. Submit the form to register your watch device.
  7. In “Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles”, locate your .watchkitextension Provisioning Profile for your app. Select & download this profile.
    7
  8. Locate your downloaded profile file on your computer & double click the Provisioning Profile.
  9. Restart Xcode.
  10. Build your project and you will encounter a iOS Development Certificate alert.
    10
  11. Warning, this step may be dangerous (proceed at your own risk). This worked for me. Click on “Revoke and Request”. This will revoke your current certificate and request a new one. You will probably get an email notifying you that “Your Certificate Has Been Revoked”.
  12. Run your Xcode project. Your watch app should now load the development build on your actual watch hardware.

About the author: Rex Feng enjoys iOS development and has released Pomodoro Pro for the iPhone & Apple Watch. You can follow him @rexfeng.

Maintainable Client JavaScript

I’ve been reading Maintainable JavaScript by Nicholas C. Zakas lately. It has been very insightful into best practices across larger teams. When you have a large team and adopt a consistent coding style, it makes working across your codebase easier.

In Chapter 5 of the book, Zakas covers the UI as a mix of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. He mentions that tightly coupling these three layers makes it “impossible to make small changes without changing one or two other layers.

Also, I’ve been working with AngularJS recently. I understand the benefits of a front end framework to keep data in sync throughout your client. Angular fans tout the benefits of a SPA (single page application) framework.

As someone who strives to separate the structure (HTML) from the scripting (JS), Angular feels too tightly coupled to me. Angular works by tagging everything with ng- and letting the magic work behind the scenes. The application dependencies are hardcoded everywhere in your HTML, and there is no way to swap your framework without changing your HTML drastically.

I’ve worked with Backbone in the past, and now I’m trying out Angular. At some point, I’ll probably try out Ember. I’d like a front end framework that plays well with Rails, so perhaps Ember will be fun.